What is epoxy flooring? Is it viable for bathroom floors? any other option for non slippery floors?

I used to work for a company that did this kind of work. We did garages, bathroom, decks, around pools, just about anything you can think of for dif...



I used to work for a company that did this kind of work. We did garages, bathroom, decks, around pools, just about anything you can think of for different purposes. Most of these products are designed for the professional to apply. A large portion of our business came from the DIY type of person who attempted to do this stuff on their own having never done it before and failed. We made our money stripping their "oops" and re-applying. The prep, mix application and cure are all pivotal, if you do one wrong, you will have bubbles, peeling, seperation, etc. I have done this work, basically at an apprentice level and I would not attempt it in my home even given what I know. Given the economy and the lack of work in construction type business everybody is eager for work and to give a bid. Look in your phone book for the obvious like flooring but also "coatings" and "sealants". Call these people, tell them what you would like to do. When they give the reccommended product they would use or give the bid (if given a bid, ask the name of the product to be used) check the product name on the internet. The manufacturers of these products list everything from flashpoint, to applications, to the process required during installation for the manufacturer to back the product under warranty. When getting a bid ask what the installers warranty is on the product. If the installer botches the installation it is on them to correct the situation, and if it is a manufacturer issue the installer will have to fix the problem and argue with the manufacturer, not you. Given the economy and that trade right now, you will probably get the best product for the cheapest price with the best quality installer right now and save some head aches.

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4 Responses to “What is epoxy flooring? Is it viable for bathroom floors? any other option for non slippery floors?”

  1. Mr Fixit says:

    epoxy is a two part paint system that interact to harden. There is a system I have seen using chips broadcast into the paint that looks very nice, and extremely waterproof. http://www.floorchips.com
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  2. Tammy W says:

    Epoxy flooring is generally used for garages.. You can use on bathroom floor, but tends to be a little slick when wet. I would try a non-skid floor paint. It looks like it contains sand.
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  3. John V says:

    They do make non skid floor tiles and sheet vinyl., do not use epoxy in a bathroom.
    References :

  4. Jim says:

    I used to work for a company that did this kind of work. We did garages, bathroom, decks, around pools, just about anything you can think of for different purposes. Most of these products are designed for the professional to apply. A large portion of our business came from the DIY type of person who attempted to do this stuff on their own having never done it before and failed. We made our money stripping their "oops" and re-applying. The prep, mix application and cure are all pivotal, if you do one wrong, you will have bubbles, peeling, seperation, etc. I have done this work, basically at an apprentice level and I would not attempt it in my home even given what I know. Given the economy and the lack of work in construction type business everybody is eager for work and to give a bid. Look in your phone book for the obvious like flooring but also "coatings" and "sealants". Call these people, tell them what you would like to do. When they give the reccommended product they would use or give the bid (if given a bid, ask the name of the product to be used) check the product name on the internet. The manufacturers of these products list everything from flashpoint, to applications, to the process required during installation for the manufacturer to back the product under warranty. When getting a bid ask what the installers warranty is on the product. If the installer botches the installation it is on them to correct the situation, and if it is a manufacturer issue the installer will have to fix the problem and argue with the manufacturer, not you. Given the economy and that trade right now, you will probably get the best product for the cheapest price with the best quality installer right now and save some head aches.
    References :

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